Educator Examines “Coming Out” Process, Sexual Fluidity In College Students

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Recently Published Research Counters Claims of Widespread Harm and Ineffectiveness of Sexual Attraction Fluidity Exploration in Therapy (SAFE-T)

An online survey of 125 men in the USA who had been or still were engaged in sexual fluidity exploration in therapy (SAFE-T) with licensed mental health professionals has recently been published in the peer- reviewed journal Linacre Quarterly. The study by Santero, Whitehead, and Ballesteros (2018) had participants rate their experiences of change, harm, benefit, and type of intervention at three intervals: before, during, and (where applicable) after their therapy experience.

Resolving Trauma and Addiction: The Reintegrative Protocol™

Trauma and addictions are similar in that they both induce emotionally dysregulated trance states of altered consciousness (Miller, 2012; Shapiro & Forrest, 1997). Trauma invokes this trance state with negative, painful affect, and addiction invokes it with positive, pleasurable affects. Iraq war veterans and rape victims know this all too well when they are presented with reminders of their traumas. Addicts can often recall with vivid detail the “rush” of their first experience getting high with such clarity that it almost feels like it is happening in the present. This is not just true for drug abuse. This phenomenon can be observed with behavioral addictions like gambling addiction and sexual addictions. The resolution of these trance states can often be achieved by reintegrating the client’s core affects and unmet relational needs. The Reintegrative ProtocolTM aims to achieve this.The focus of this paper will specifically examine the protocol’s application within the context of treating males presenting with same-sex attractions and will provide instructions for using self-compassion as a method of trauma resolution, as well as instructions for EMDR-trained psychotherapists who wish to use EMDR as a method of trauma resolution.

Guidelines for the Practice of Sexual Attraction Fluidity Exploration in Therapy

Many significant developments have occurred in the field of same-sex sexuality in the decade since the Alliance for Therapeutic Choice and Scientific Integrity (ATCSI) introduced the first edition of its Practice Guidelines (ATCSI, 2010). These developments necessitated that the guidelines be updated to address the professional and legal realities that face therapists who assist individuals in exploring the fluidity of their unwanted same-sex attractions and behavior. The revised Guidelines incorporate the now preferred language of sexual attraction fluidity exploration in therapy1 (SAFE-T) as the most accurate description of contemporary professional clinical intervention with these individuals.